Trentham Golf Club

Between the Wars


The security of the 1922 lease enabled the Management Committee to consider the future with confidence, and to plan for twenty years ahead. Their immediate concern was an enlarged and refurbished Club House with enhanced dining facilities.  This was given priority over course improvements, which were undertaken more gradually, though ultimately both contributed to the claim that Trentham was---the nearest approach to a Society club that this district possesses."

Negotiations for the new lease of the course from the Sutherland Estate Trustees were handled by J C Bailey, Joel Settle and Alex Scrivener, among others, with Walter Webb once more acting as Honorary Secretary. He had taken up this post again when the paid secretary gave up in 1918. Among other issues in 1921 was that of appointing a new salaried secretary, and when the Club's future was assured George M Parratt, a low handicap player but not a member, was given the job in July at £200 per year. He thus joined Miss M Kent, the Stewardess who had succeeded Mrs Lyth in October 1916, and Hughes, the professional, in the team of full-time employees. Miss Kent proved a popular and effective house manager. She was to be much helped by her sister, Dolly, and the Misses Kent obviously became something of an institution in the Club. They were not replaced until March 1938, shortly before the senior one died after a long illness.

A short-term financial embarrassment was solved in March 1922 with a gift of £89 from a founder member Joel Settle, to clear a deficit in the accounts, but the major talking point in the Club was the need to improve amenities. The huge increase in rent to £500 per year, and extra expenditure oil salaries, necessitated additional income. Whether the Club should build tennis courts to generate revenue was one question raised. Could the Club afford new locker rooms and lavatories, better accommodation for the Stewardess, electricity and a shower bath? Central to the proposals were alterations to the dining room which were so controversial that Mr Redmond's first plan, although more acceptable than that by Mr Watts, was rejected in July 1922. A revised version, costed initially at over £2,500, was accepted in January 1923 only after much lobbying by J S Goddard, the President. Another mortgage was ruled out as too burdensome, and the alterations were financed by loans from menibers, and an appeal for gifts of over £10. The construction work was completed in 1923, and Mr Redmond's efforts as the architect were rewarded with an Honorary Membership.

FINE GOLFING AND OUTSTANDING HOSPITALITY






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